Yeehaw! Saturday at Knott’s

As mentioned in my last Knott’s Berry Farm post, lots of visits are planned this summer, because Ghost Town Alive is just too much fun. So over the weekend, Patrick and I went for the day. We’ve been having a bit of “June Gloom” recently, but I didn’t mind the mild weather, as it worked out perfectly to wear my new (to me) vest that I recently bought.

I want to thank those of you who commented on my last post where I shared my vintage California linens. I think my charm bracelet collection will be the next collection I share. Also, feel free to keep the post suggestions coming!

Outfit
Hat: Redlands Galleria, Redlands, California
Shirt, Boots, & Purse: Buffalo Exchange
String Tie & Coral Ring: I don’t remember…
Vest: Paper Moon, Los Angeles, California
Skirt: Dolly & Dotty
Rodeo Queen Ring: Gift

Corriganville

Over the weekend Patrick and I visited Corriganville Park, the former location of Corriganville, a western backlot and amusement park of sorts from 1949 to 1965.

Corriganville was built by movie and TV actor Ray Bernard, but better known as Crash Corrigan. After going on a hunting trip in Simi Valley with fellow actor, Clark Gable, in 1935, Corrigan fell in love with the area. In 1937, Corrigan purchased over 1,000 acres of land, and built his home there. He eventually went on to build an entire western backlot, dubbed Silvertown, and many films and TV showers were filmed there, including Fort Apache, The Bandit of Sherwood Forest, How the West was Won, Lassie, The Lone Ranger, Gunsmoke, and more. In 1949 Corrigan decided to open his backlot to the public, and the area turned into an amusement park on weekends, while still being a fully functioning backlot during the week. Think of it like a blend of Knott’s Berry Farm and Universal Studios.

He also allowed film crews to build their own sets, as long as they left them standing after filming, which is how the area got a “Corsican Village” after Howard Hughes’ 1950 film Vendetta.

After selling Corriganville in 1965 to Bob Hope, the area suffered two fires, one in 1971 and another in 1979, leaving almost nothing standing. Today, Corriganville is a park, and visitors can walk among the concrete foundations and visit what remains of a man-made lake that was originally used for the Jungle Jim series, but was used in for a variety of films, including Creature from the Black Lagoon and The African Queen, as it featured a camera house built under a bridge with thick glass windows, allowing for underwater filming.

Continue reading for images of the remains of Corriganville, postcards of what it looked like, and more!

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There’s a Snake in my Boot!

Over the weekend some friends, Patrick, and myself went to the California Science Center as the museum was having an exhibit about the science behind Pixar animation. As lovers of all things Disney, we were excited to further understand what goes into making some of our favorite films. It also gave us a swell chance to Disneybound as characters from some of the Disney/Pixar films. With all of the western wear in my closet, I opted to bound as Woody.

The exhibit was really interesting, and gave me a greater appreciation for the films that Pixar has created. The museum is also the place to go for family friendly science exhibits, although we didn’t get to visit many of them, as we spent a good long while in the Pixar exhibit, followed by time gazing at the massive space shuttle Endeavour that the museum recently acquired. I look forward to a return visit to the California Science Center sometime in the future.

For those in the southern California area, or planning on visiting soon, the Science Behind Pixar exhibit goes through April 16th. Purchasing tickets in advance is highly recommended.

Outfit
Vintage H Bar C Shirt: Junk for Joy, Burbank, California
String Tie: Joyride, Orange, California
Skirt: Rock Steady via Roadkill Ranch, Fullerton, Ca.
Boots: Antique Alley, Portland, Oregon
Cowboy Boot Earrings: Gift
Tooled Leather Purse & Saddle Ring: I don’t remember…
Hat & Horseshoe Ring: Disneyland

Goodbye, 2016!

And HELLO, 2017! I’ll spare you reflections on 2016, and thoughts on 2017, because it’s all rather convoluted, and really not what this blog is about, so instead share with y’all what I wore for New Year’s Eve! This year we opted to go to Knott’s Berry Farm for their New Year’s Eve celebrations, and it was a lovely evening and a swell way to ring in the New Year, despite the wee bit of rain earlier in the day, hence the rain boots!

And if you’re wondering why the hearse and cemetery as a choice of location for New Year’s Eve photos… It’s because I was so pleased to see 2016 die and be buried, and thought it fitting.

How did you celebrate ringing in 2017?

Outfit
Vintage H bar C Shirt: Found by my dad
String Tie: Joyride, Orange, California
Skirt: Pinup Girl Clothing
Rain Boots: Coach
Chimayo Clutch: Great American Antiques, Bakersfield, California

A Song for You

Patrick and I didn’t have much down time after leaving Portland, because I had booked the weekend at the Joshua Tree Inn months ago, as the weekend marked the anniversary of Gram Parsons’ death at the Inn, and I was lucky enough to secure room eight, the very room in which Parsons passed away in. Yeah, call me morbid, but to me, it’s one step closer to history.

ar-jtisept16-00

During our visit to Portland, I hung out with my friend Alicia, an amazing artist who recently started designing gorgeous ouija boards. I told her I wanted one featuring a cowgirl and a jackalope, and over lunch we discussed the design, and I was blown away when she presented it to me while we were out for drinks the night before started our journey home – she knocked this out in just two days! She even told me it was Gram’s eye that she drew on the planchette. So it was this ouija board I took out with me during our stay to see if I could make contact with the legendary musician.

Sadly, there was no response from Gram, but if I’m honest, I think he’s either too cool to stick around as a ghost, or has found peace.

This was my third time staying at the Joshua Tree Inn, and I love it more and more with every visit. Gram’s connection aside, it is one of the most relaxing places I have ever stayed. It’s just the most perfect place to chill out and recharge, I can’t wait to return.

Outfit
Gram Parsons and the Fallen Angels tee: Worn Free
Skirt: Fables by Barrie
Shoes: Minnetonka
Coral & Mother of Pearl Necklace: Ebler’s Leather & Saddlery Emporium, Columbia, California
Turquoise & Coral Cuff: West of Texas, Redlands California
Rings: Here and there, included West of Texas

Swimsuit: Esther Williams

Oujia Board by Alicia find her on the following sites: Facebook, Instagram, Etsy

A Return to the Autry

A few years ago during a visit to California we took time to visit the Autry Museum of the American West. I was slightly crushed over the fact I didn’t blog about it, which was for a combination of reasons. First, it was very overwhelming! There is so much stuff at the Autry, and my eyes couldn’t stop darting around at all of the wonderful stuff there was to see! Additionally, museums are notoriously difficult to photograph. And the few photos I did take in the first room turned out so horrible I didn’t bother to continue. But we returned recently and I took loads of photos! Some are still not as great as I would like them to be, but I still want to share some of the Autry’s treasures with you! But before we get to that, let’s take a peek at what I wore, because it was pretty darn awesome.

This suit is one of the most prized pieces in my western wear collection, and one I didn’t even find. In fact my dad found it at the Portland Antique Expo, and sent an image of it to me and only eyeballed the measurements, and when it arrived I was overjoyed that it fit perfectly! It’s by Rodeo Ben, who is one of the pioneers in western wear in the 20th century, along side Nathan Turk and Nudie Cohn. Many credit Rodeo Ben with developing the snap closures, and photographs show his work using snaps as early as 1933. It should be noted however that Rockmount was the first manufacturer to use snaps, beginning 1946. Like Turk and Nudie, Rodeo Ben did work for the likes of such western legends as Roy Rogers and Gene Autry. And the Autry even has pieces by Rodeo Ben in its collection.

I paired my suit with another prized piece, a vintage sterling silver and 14 karat gold ranger belt made by Edward Bohlin. Bohlin is hailed as a true artist with it comes to cowboy belt buckles and saddles. His gorgeous “Big Saddle” (there is an image of it after the cut) is on display at the Autry, with a plaque reading it “reportedly took fourteen years to complete and weighs approximately seventy pounds.” The belt is not just an amazing artifact by a well-known maker, but it means a lot personally. It originally belonged to my grandfather, my dad’s dad, who was a bit of a cowboy himself. While born in Oklahoma, he grew up on a ranch in Texas. And in the photos I’ve found while working on our family’s genealogy I’ve uncovered more than one image of the man riding, along with images of my grandmother and dad riding as well. I even found some of him with a lariat.

For those interested in what The Autry has to offer, keep reading!

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