Case Study House 1953

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When Janey and I were in LA for the Hollywood Costume Exhibition we also took the rest of the day to investigate some of the Case Study houses in the West Hollywood/Beverly Hills area. If you haven’t heard of the Case Study House program there is a small introduction in my first post on Case Study House #25.

Case Study House 1953 (also called Case Study House #16) was built high up in the hills of Bel Air by Craig Ellwood who would design and build two more homes for the program. Ellwood was originally a cost estimator at a construction company and a structural engineer and wouldn’t actually become a licensed architect until the late 1950s, as a result Robert Theron Peters did most of the technical work and architectural sign-off required to build his designs.

If you are thinking about driving up to go see the house, don’t. It’s a long terrifying drive up steep and winding streets, with nearly no parking, into Bel Air and the design of the house presents only a carport and a frosted glass facade to the street that hides a small courtyard and the bedrooms.

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The house has a quite a few interesting features including a jungle gym on the back wall of the carport which is part of a larger play area and a combined living room and TV room separated by a partition. Both bedrooms also have their own private courtyards at the front of the house.

4 thoughts on “Case Study House 1953

  1. I LOVE that house, the courtyard, the living room, every detail in the paneling is fantastic. I would definitely love in a house like that.

  2. Oh my gosh, the layout of this house is just glorious! It’s so open, but still gives lots of privacy. I’m totally in love!

    Naomi
    teenyboppinalong.blogspot.com

  3. Fabulous house – I’m struck by how much natural light it must get. That – an abundance of natural light – is something that I adore in homes, yet currently lack in ours (we have other condos on three sides of us and a lovely, but rather towing, hill on the fourth). Architects who embrace light and aren’t afraid of large windows always get a major thumbs up from me.

    ♥ Jessica

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