Petersen Automotive Museum

First off, I want to thank those of you who commented in my last post about what you wanted to see on the blog. It was so wonderful to get ideas from you, as well as receive support for the types of posts I already do. It’s your positive comments that really keep me going. I have many post ideas now and I can’t wait to start working on them. Also, keep the suggestions coming!

Now, to the subject at hand! Over the weekend Patrick and I went to the Petersen Automotive Museum. Some of you might remember that Patrick and I visited in spring last year, but only for the unveiling of the Back to the Future DeLorean, and were unable to explore the rest of the museum. So it was nice to return and see the amazing collection the museum has to offer.

I’ll kick off the post with what I wore, with photos and information about the museum after.

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Palm Springs Village Green Museums

Patrick and I just returned home from a week in Palm Springs, like we do every March, as Patrick has an annual work conference there. During this year’s visit I spent a lot time at museums, and finally visited several small museums that are all clustered together.

Located in the heart of Palm Springs is the Village Green, a small park that is home to not one, not two, not even three, but four small museums; the Cornelia White House, the McCallum Adobe, Ruddy’s General Store, and the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum.

I’ll start with my favorite, the Cornelia White House. The building itself was originally built by Dr. and Mrs. Welwood Murray in 1893, and was built using railroad ties from a failed narrow-gauge line connecting the Southern Pacific depot with Palmdale. And was part of the couple’s Palm Springs Hotel. It was later purchased by Cornelia Butler White, and this woman was quite the character!

Cornelia White was born in 1874 in upstate New York, and one of eleven children. She loved to travel, and even traveled the Nile River in Egypt. She was also a professor, and from 1905 to 1912 taught domestic science at the University of North Dakota. Following her teaching stint, she moved to Mexico. One of Cornelia’s sisters, Florilla White, a doctor by trade, joined her, along with Carl Lykken, a mining engineer. However as revolutionary war broke out in Mexico, the trio had to flee. They escaped by operating a railroad handcar and traveled over 80 miles to the coast. Before joining her sister in Mexico, Florilla had spent time in Palm Springs at the hotel operated by Dr. Murray, and after escaping Mexico, Florilla suggested a move to Palm Springs. After arriving in Palm Springs in 1913, they bought the hotel Murray owned, and by 1915, another White sister, Isabel White, joined them. Isabel eventually married an author by the name of J. Smeaton Chase, while neither of the sisters, nor their friend Lykken, ever married.

Cornelia enjoyed riding, hiking, and even participating in cattle driving! And she always wore a leather jacket, riding breeches and boots. She is quoted as saying “But I do have dresses and petticoats, I want you to know. I keep them to wear to funerals. I’m afraid it just wouldn’t do to go in riding breeches and my fringed leather jacket – would it?”

By 1944, after Florilla’s death, Cornelia’s home was at risk of being demolished. It was saved though, and moved to another location. Cornelia lived there until 1959, and passed away in 1961. In 1979 the house was moved by flatbed truck to its current location at the Village Green. It is the second oldest standing building Palm Springs, and resides, fittingly, next to the McCallum Adobe, which is the oldest standing building in Palm Springs.

Needless to say it sounds like Cornelia is a woman after my own heart! Her home is a very unique treasure within Palm Springs. Some of the items inside the home belonged to Cornelia, while other pieces of the period were donated.

The Cornelia White House is open Wednesday through Saturday 10:00 am to 4:00 pm, and Sundays noon to 3:00 pm. It is free to the public, but a $1.00 donation is suggested.

Next to the Cornelia White House is the McCallum Adobe, which as I mentioned above, is the oldest standing building in Palm Springs, and was built in 1885 by John and Emily McCallum, the area’s first white settlers, with the help of local Native Americans. It was originally built on the corner of Palm Canyon Drive and Tahquitz Way, where it was later part of the Oasis Hotel. It was moved to its current site in 1950.

Today the McCallum Adobe is a museum dedicated to the history of Palm Springs, from Native Americans to it becoming the sun-soaked playground of the stars. The McCallum Adobe Museum does not allow for photography, so sadly I cannot share any of its amazing artifacts with you. The McCallum Adobe keeps the same hours as the Cornelia White House. It is also free to visit, but a $1.00 donation is also suggested.

To the right of the McCallum Adobe is Ruddy’s General Store, which is really something, in that it is a complete fictional general store. It is made up entirely of one man’s collection of new-old stock merchandise from shops, and has items from the turn-of-the-century through the 1960s, but with its main focus on the 1930s and 40s.

Ruddy’s General Store costs 95 cents to take a turn about. It’s open during the months of September through May, Thursday through Sunday, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm.

To the right of Ruddy’s General Store is the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum.

Like the McCullum Adobe, the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum does not allow for photography. The museum offers insight into the Native Americans who first called the Palm Springs and Coachella Valley area home, and during my visit housed an incredible display on basketry.

The Agua Caliente Cultural Museum is free to visit, although you can make a donation if you wish. They also have a wonderful selection books about Native Americans, as well turquoise jewelry for purchase.

That wraps up the first of three Palm Springs posts! I hope you are all having a wonderful weekend!

Cast a Spell

Over the weekend one of my friends celebrated her birthday, and she decided she wanted to have a 50s Harry Potter theme for us to spend a day at Universal Studios, which last year opened the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. While I knew I could have easily opted for a 50s student look, when I heard a friend say she was going to dress up with a 50s Professor Umbridge inspired look, I decided to opt for a Professor McGonagall look, as she’s one of my favorites.

While Professor McGonagall has a few different looks throughout the Harry Potter films, she does wear the same ensemble in the first two films, and I believe is her most recognizable to be inspired by for my outfit. If you need a refresher or are unfamiliar, take a peek here.

Are you a fan of Harry Potter? It was certainly a defining moment in my adolescence! And continues to be something I re-read, re-watch, and am inspired by to this day.

Outfit
Hat (feathers added by me): Simply Vintage Boutique, Portland, Oregon
Jacket (which is part of a gown ensemble): Elsewhere Vintage, Orange, California
Top (which is actually a dress, though super short!): Buffalo Exchange
Skirt: Pinup Girl Clothing
Brooch: Antique Alley, Portland, Oregon
Tights and Harry Potter Charm Bracelet: Target
Shoes: Re-Mix

Christmas Eve at Knott’s

For Christmas Eve this year, Patrick and I spent the day at Knott’s Berry Farm. I bought two Christmas themed string ties at Joyride (the menswear counterpart to my favorite vintage clothing store, Elsewhere Vintage) recently, and I’ll admit the other one is way cooler than this one, but I just couldn’t create the perfect ensemble for it. So I hope between now and next year I’ll find just the right shirt for it.

We spent part of the day interacting with some of Calico’s returning citizens from Ghost Town Alive, as well as hanging out with some of our friends who also chose to spend their Christmas Eve at Knott’s. To top off the day Patrick and I were selected to help with lighting the Christmas tree! So I must thank Mrs. Parnell, Kenny, and Mr. Knolls for one of the best Christmas gifts this year!

As for Christmas Day, we spent it at Disneyland, and I’ll share that with you next! I hope you all had a lovely holiday, whatever you celebrate!

Outfit
Jacket: Thrifted
Shirt: Rockmount (but found by my dad!)
String Tie: Joyride, Orange, California
Skirt: Pinup Girl Clothing
Boots: Buffalo Exchange
Purse: Lafayette School House Antique Mall, Lafayette, Oregon
Earrings: An antique mall in Cathedral City I think…
Rings: Various

A Stroll Down Mane Street

No, that’s not a typo, I really did mean “mane” like a horse’s mane, because today I’m sharing some images from one of my favorite high desert locations, Pioneertown, and it really is Mane Street there.

Just after my family left from visiting for my grandmother’s services, Patrick’s mother came to visit for a week, and when she departed, he and I headed out for the high desert of Joshua Tree for a few nights for some much needed R&R. After checking in at my favorite place to relax, the Joshua Tree Inn, we headed up to Pioneertown for dinner at Pappy & Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace.

Pioneertown was founded in 1946 a group of Hollywood personalities, but lead by cowboy actors Dick Curtis and Russell Hayden, who decided it was time for a permanent 1880s style town for filming the popular westerns of the day. It was the legend himself, Roy Rogers who broke ground for the first building on September 1, 1946. The town takes its name from western singing group, Sons of the Pioneers, which Rogers was a part of.

 

Outfit
Fringe Leather Jacket & Belt: I don’t remember!
Blouse & Boots: Buffalo Exchange
Skirt: Switchblade Stiletto
Rings: Here and there…

Knott’s Merry Farm

During the holiday season Knott’s Berry Farm transforms into Knott’s Merry Farm with spectacular shows, lights, and even a tree lighting. I was very eager to visit Knott’s for the holiday season as just a few weeks prior to kicking off the holidays they announced that some familiar faces from Ghost Town Alive (read more about Ghost Town Alive here) would be returning for the holiday season.

One of Calico’s returning citizens was Doctor Carter, the town doctor and a bit of an inventor. Inspired by his new bride’s love of Christmas and wanting to keep the town safe, he told me he created a generator so the town’s Christmas tree could be lit with electric light instead of candles. He was very proud of his invention and took us to see it after showing us his plans.

At five o’clock, Mayor Parnell and gemologist Ophelia arrived along with Doctor Carter to light the tree, along with the beautiful lights in Ghost Town.

If you are local and didn’t get to Knott’s Berry Farm this year, but thinking of getting a pass for 2017, I recommend doing it soon! They are currently running a promotion where if you buy a pass for next year, you get to go one day this year! So you can go and enjoy Merry Farm and get a taste of Ghost Town Alive (which will be returning next summer)! Visit Knott’s website to learn more. If you aren’t local but visiting California during the holiday season or during summer next year, I highly recommend a visit to Knott’s! You won’t regret it!

In the meantime, Patrick and I have been decorating for Christmas, so I hope to share our home with you in the near future!

Outfit
Cowichan Sweater: Monticello Antique Marketplace, Portland, Oregon
Peasant Top: Buffalo Exchange
Skirt: Deja Vu, now known as The Frippery, Palm Springs, California
Pressed Leather Wedges: Olvera Street, Los Angeles
Tooled Leather Purse: Found by my dad
Coral & Mother of Pearl Necklace: Ebler’s Leather & Saddlery Emporium, Columbia, California
Bracelet: Ortega’s Trading Post, San Juan Capistrano, California
Rings: Here and there…

The Magic of the Movies

Back in March Patrick and I got passes to Universal Studios, and while I have been a handful of times between then and now with some of my friends, Patrick had only gone twice so far. So, over the weekend we went and I got dolled up in a vintage inspired Ravenclaw ensemble and we enjoyed a day at Universal Studios. I also took my first Harry Potter inspired parasol for a spin, which I made awhile ago real quick when some of my friends and I went on an extremely hot day.

I often insist on doing the Studio Tour every visit, as your route can change visit to visit depending on what is being shot on the backlot. During this visit we had an extensive spin around the Mexican Street, the western area of Six Points, and the European Village area. So below are loads of backlot photos!

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