Disneyland on Film

Hello it’s Patrick here to do another post with some new 120 photographs from our last trip to Disneyland. Unlike last time, where Janey was just too depressed to write about it, I’m here to explain some of the more technical side to shooting 120 film.

When I first met Janey she was astounded that I didn’t collect anything and promptly started up a camera collection for me. Fast forward a few years to this last visit, where it was the fourth time taking our Kodak Dualflex II to Disneyland.

Shooting with this camera has quickly become one of my favorite things to do, even though the process of preparing and shooting the film is rather tricky. We buy the film (Kodak Portra 400) at Pro Photo Supply in NW Portland. The film comes on spools sized for 620 film, but it still works. In a pitch black room I have to unroll the film from the spool and roll it back onto a 120 film spool (I’ve amassed quiet a stock pile of the spools from the various camera’s in my collection). Two spools are needed to use the film, one to wind the film around and the other which the film will be wound onto while being shot.

When done shooting, we return to Pro Photo Supply because they have an in house lab we we drop our film for development, and we can get our pictures back in a few days.

Here are the best out of the four rolls of film we shot at the park!

Down Main Street

In Front of Castle

Castle Offset

Tiki Dress in Adventure Land

Tiki Dress in Adventure Land 2

In Front of Tiki Room

Jungle Cruise Sign

Natives

Train Station

Columbia

Mark Twain

Golden Horseshoe Sign

In Frontier Land

In Frontier Land 2 copy

In Front of Log Cabin copy

Small World

Materhorn

It’s a ton of fun to shoot with this camera, but you do need some experience shooting film for at least calculating proper exposures. I used 400 speed film which seems to match up pretty well with the aperture settings on the front of the camera for “Hazy Sun”, “Bright Sun” and “Brilliant Sun/Snow”. The shutter speed on the camera is also very slow, which means capturing fast action, like on the Jungle Cruise, is difficult but can be done.

Hopefully this post clears up some of the mystery surrounding shooting film on old cameras!

6 thoughts on “Disneyland on Film

  1. Such delightfully lovely Disney photos – it’s always a treat to see 120 shots, especially of super fun places like this. (You’re not alone, Patrick, I was rather shocked when I met my sweet husband, Tony, that he didn’t collect too much either – to a die hard collector of numerous things, that seemed so foreign to me.)

    ♥ Jessica

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