King Tut Exhibit

Like many I have met, I have long been enchanted with ancient Egypt, so when it was announced and exhibit of King Tutankhamun artifacts was going to be at the California Science Center many of my friends were excited to go, and we arranged a date to attend together. Sadly, I ended up with a terrible stomach ache that day, but thankfully Patrick and I were able to exchange our tickets for a different date, and we attended on our own.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

A carved goblet featuring lotus flowers.

An elaborate earring featuring a bird.

Part of the decorative portions that his body was wrapped in, him in his spirit form, as part bird, among many hieroglyphics.

Me, standing against a backdrop that looks like the walls of an Egyptian tomb.

Unlike some past exhibits, which are made up of replicas, this exhibit features all actual artifacts of King Tut’s tomb. This is also the largest King Tut exhibition to tour the globe, with over 150 artifacts, including 60 of which have never left Egypt before. Among some of my favorite pieces were the miniature game of Senet (which I have fond memories of playing with my mother when I was younger), the conopic jar stopper, and of course the variety of jewelry.

A mini version of the game Senet.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

Me, standing against a brick wall, wearing a brown blouse and tan skirt, and wide bring straw hat with brown velvet trim

A small figure of Tut in gold.

A necklace of beads and gold featuring the sun and lotus flowers

The top of one of Tut's conopic jars, which features his likeness.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

A close up of my brooch, gold metal with a green glass image of King Tut.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

A carved box where the lid is a cartouche featuring Tut's name.

A bracelet featuring scarabs.

A statue of Tut atop a panther.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

Close up of my shoes and purse. Purse is a leather clutch with a scene of ancient Egypt, with palm trees and pyramids. Shoes a faux alligator and brown suede.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

A mirror in the shape of an ankh

An elaborate box for storing a bow. The box features images of Tut hunting.

A mural featuring Egyptian style wings with the sun above.

Small carved status of Tut and his wife.

Close up of some hieroglyphics that were placed on his body, made of gold.

A scarab necklace, made of gold and precious stones.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

A brooch of a winged scarab.

A large statue of gold and black of Tut.

A statue of Horus with a large sun disc above featuring a winged scarab.

Me, outside of the museum in the rose garden, wearing a straw hat in brown velvet trim, a brown blouse with a gold and green brooch featuring the face of King Tut, a tan linen skirt, and brown and tan shoes.

The center of a large fan, the gold image feature Tut hunting ostriches, which would have been the feathers to make up the fan.

A necklace featuring the eye of Horus.

The Wishing Cup, featuring hieroglyphics and lotus flowers.

A portion of a large statue of Tut

Me, standing against a backdrop that looks like the walls of an Egyptian tomb.

The exhibit will remain at the California Science Center in LA until January 9th, then it will go onto Europe, visiting ten cities over the next seven years. In addition to being the largest exhibit, this will also be the last time the artifacts of King Tut’s tomb will be on display outside of Egypt. Ticket sales from this exhibition are going to fund a permanent King Tut wing at the Grand Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

It is important to note that the iconic Death Mask, sarcophagus, and mummy are not part of this tour. The Death Mask is considered too fragile for touring, and remains at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo per the Egyptian government. Meanwhile King Tut’s mummy remains within his tomb in the Valley of the Kings, being removed only for scientific study, and has never left Egypt.

I highly recommend this exhibit if you are interested in ancient Egypt. It is a highly informative exhibit, sharing information on both King Tut and Howard Carter, the famed Egyptologist who discovered Tut’s tomb. The artifacts are displayed well, many in four sided glass cases, so you can view the front, back, and side.

To learn more about the exhibit, and receive updates on where it will go next, visit the website.

Outfit
Hat: Urban Eccentric, Vancouver, Washington
Blouse: Simply Vintage Boutique, Portland, Oregon
Skirt: Antique Alley, Portland, Oregon
Purse: Portland Antique Expo
Shoes: Re-Mix
Earrings: AlexSandra’s Vintage Emporium, Portland, Oregon
Brooch: ???
Ring: Found by my dad
Bracelets: A Rolling Stone, Redlands, California

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