200 Years of Sleepy Hollow

In 1819 American writer Washington Irving penned a short story that  would go on to become one of the most enduring Halloween classics, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” For just over 200 years, Ichabod Crane and his advisory the Headless Horseman have been interpreted time and time again and in variety of ways. Last weekend LEGEND: 200 Years of Sleepy Hollow opened at Anaheim’s Muzeo, which explores the impact that “Sleepy Hollow” has had over the centuries.

When it comes to “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” I love almost any and all interpretations of it. From its original story, which I’ve seen adapted on stage, to the Disney cartoon, to Tim Burton’s dark film version, and even the 2013 TV show, which cast the charming Tom Mison as Ichabod. Burton’s 1999 version is perhaps the most popular, and it’s easy to see why. Burton created stunning visuals, with characters dressed in stunning costumes designed by Colleen Atwood, all of which was set to Danny Elfman’s spectacular score. Burton’s take even inspired a clothing collection last year from La Femme en Noir, and I purchased the dress based on Katrina’s black and white stripe dress, which felt ever so fitting to wear to the exhibit.

Myself, wearing a black and white stripe dress, a pin featuring the Headless Horseman, Ichabod and Katrina sits at the center of the neckline, a black choker with a rhinestone star charm in the center, standing in front of a large wooden door with black, curling wrought iron details.

Myself, wearing a black and white stripe dress, a pin featuring the Headless Horseman, Ichabod and Katrina sits at the center of the neckline, a black choker with a rhinestone star charm in the center, and black lace up boots, standing in front of a large wooden door with black, curling wrought iron details.

Myself, wearing a black and white stripe dress, a pin featuring the Headless Horseman, Ichabod and Katrina sits at the center of the neckline, a black choker with a rhinestone star charm in the center, standing in front of a large wooden door with black, curling wrought iron details.

Close-up of my pin, which features two oval frames, one features Ichabod, the other Katrina, above the frames is the Headless Horseman with his sword raised and horse rearing.

Myself, wearing a black and white stripe dress, a pin featuring the Headless Horseman, Ichabod and Katrina sits at the center of the neckline, a black choker with a rhinestone star charm in the center, standing in front of a large wooden door with black, curling wrought iron details.

Myself, wearing a black and white stripe dress, a pin featuring the Headless Horseman, Ichabod and Katrina sits at the center of the neckline, a black choker with a rhinestone star charm in the center, standing in front of a large wooden door with black, curling wrought iron details.

Myself, wearing a black and white stripe dress, a pin featuring the Headless Horseman, Ichabod and Katrina sits at the center of the neckline, a black choker with a rhinestone star charm in the center, and black lace up boots, standing in front of a large wooden door with black, curling wrought iron details.

Myself, wearing a black and white stripe dress, a pin featuring the Headless Horseman, Ichabod and Katrina sits at the center of the neckline, a black choker with a rhinestone star charm in the center, and black lace up boots, standing in front of a large wooden door with black, curling wrought iron details.

Myself, wearing a black and white stripe dress, a pin featuring the Headless Horseman, Ichabod and Katrina sits at the center of the neckline, a black choker with a rhinestone star charm in the center, standing in front of a large wooden door with black, curling wrought iron details.

The exhibit features various publications of Irving’s story, an original Mary Blair concept piece as well as publicity pieces from Disney’s cartoon, which was released in 1949 under The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad, a recreation of the iconic Katrina dress, and more. An additional portion of the exhibit was original artwork, which showcases a variety of different interpretations of the Headless Horseman.

Myself standing in front of the Muzeo sign, which reads "Muzeo" in large letters.

Myself standing in the entrance to the exhibit which is a faux covered bridge.

Beginning of the exhibit features a sign reading "LEGEND: 200 Years of Sleepy Hollow"

Overall of the exhibit room, painted black, features small display cases and a mannequin wearing the black and white stripe dress from Tim Burton's film.

Map of the Terrytown, the original name of the area known as Sleepy Hollow, with postcards showing various landmarks.

Two covers of "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" one blue with black and gold detailing for the title and illustration of the Headless Horseman chasing Ichabod the other is black and blue of the Headless Horseman standing in between leafless trees holding a Jack o'lantern.

Concept art by Mary Blair from the Disney version, features the Headless Horseman on his horse chasing Ichabod through a farm landscape.

Publicity images for Disney's The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad.

Display of Sleepy Hollow stamps on first issue envelopes.

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow depicted in a comic book.

Close-up of a recreation of the iconic black and white stripe dress from Tim Burton's 1999 film version.

Art exhibit, a sign reads "The Legend Envisioned Original Exhibition Artwork" various art featuring the Headless Horseman is hung on black walls

Art portion, various art featuring the Headless Horseman is hung on black walls

Myself standing in the entrance to the exhibit which is a faux covered bridge.

Those in the area can visit the “Sleepy Hollow” exhibit at the Muzeo, located in downtown Anaheim at 241 S. Anaheim Boulevard. You can purchase tickets on their website.

Is there a version of “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” that is your favorite? Is watching some version of it part of your Halloween time traditions?

Outfit
Mask: Made by me, using fabric from Caley Hicks
Undermask: RZ Masks
Choker: Nordstorm Rack
Dress: Katrina from La Femme en Noir
Sleepy Hollow Pin: Walt Disney Family Museum years ago
Boots: Jasmine Courtesy of Oak Tree Farms

Leave a Comment!

4 comments on “200 Years of Sleepy Hollow”